Posted in Crafts

Making a Market Basket

Once again, I was able to join a great group of individuals at one of the local county parks for a day of basket making. I took several pictures throughout the day to capture the steps used to assemble this potluck or market basket. For those of you that are interested in basket making, I strongly suggest you find a class in your area. This is a dying art and learning the basic skills will build toward ideas for advanced methods. Local libraries, park district programs, and 4-H program leaders often offer hands-on opportunities to assemble basic baskets. Many basketmaking supply shops also offer classes. I really enjoy the process and certainly, the complete project. I always sign my baskets as I look forward to handing them down through the generations.

Sharing a few basketmaking tips…

We experienced some weather difficulties so we relocated to the interior of the old 1920’s barn. This June morning was cold and rainy. We usually meet in a covered pavilion but the winds were very strong and continued to blow away our supplies.

First, I measured 15 inches of weaving material (strips) for the length of the basket.l

I numerically marked all of my strips to help me weave a pattern on one side of the handle. Then, I duplicated the process on the other side of the wooden handle. Centering the project is very important.

Then, it was time to start working on the sides. I wanted to maintain my pattern up the side of the basket, so I used clothes pins to help me achieve this. The first row is always the most difficult to manage. The clothes pins act as another pair of “hands”.

Continue working up the side of the basket, adding any details desired. I added a colorful pattern of dyed strips. Make sure to alter the starting point for each strip, rotating the basket a half turn for an altered starting point for each row. Continue to shape the basket while building the sides.

Trim and bend alternate strips along the top edge of the basket making sure to leave enough length to insert strips under the existing basket weave.

Now it’s time for the finishing touches. An edge is placed on the top of the basket and sea grass is placed between the (half-round) edging strips. Once again, clothes pins act as extra “hands” to hold it all in place.

Lashing is used to complete the project and pull all of the finished edge pieces together.

A final dip in a black walnut wash finishes off the project by adding a weathered or aged look to the basket. Here the baskets dry in the shade of the old barn.

I love the size and shape of this beautiful basket. I can’t wait for our next basketmaking session!

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Posted in Crafts, Gifts, Sewing

Machine Embroidered Sweatshirt

My daughter had seen one of the famous Fixer Upper hosts wearing a sweatshirt with the words, “Book Club” screen printed onto the front of the garment. Being an avid reader, she immediately declared her desire to have a shirt like this for Christmas. After looking up the cost for said sweatshirt, I decided to make one of my own using my trusty embroidery machine. Carefully reviewing the garment, I quickly found a few heather colored sweatshirts at the discount store and identified a font that would work the the “Book Club” design. I didn’t care for the font used in the original design so I settled on a text style that looked just like one found when reading a book; a contemporary spin on Times New Roman. Here are the steps I used to embroider font or text onto the front of a basic medium-weight sweatshirt.

Use a temporary spray adhesive (found in the sewing department) to adhere a piece of medium weight stabilizer to the wrong side of the fabric. Make sure the stabilizer is large enough to cover and extend beyond the outside of your embroidery hoop.

Crease the sweatshirt to find it’s center and position the embroidery hoop paying close attention to desired design placement.

Audition various threads to decide which will work best for your design. I used a heavy weight black thread for the book style font.

After you have created your design (I use my laptop), send the design to your sewing machine and begin sewing.

I usually stay with the machine for a simple design and trim threads when possible.

When the machine has completed the design, remove hoop from the embroidery arm and trim any threads carefully.

Remove hoop and turn the garment inside out to sparingly trim threads from the back of the design. I usually leave connecting threads intact to further secure the design. Trim stabilizer, if needed.

With a thick pressing cloth or towel, carefully iron the crease out of the center front area.

Fold the sweatshirt neatly and get it ready for gift giving…

Have fun creating other “book related” designs…

Posted in Crafts, holiday, holidays

Handmade Pumpkin Basket

Saturday’s unseasonable temperatures made for a very chilly (end of the summer) basketmaking workshop. Wearing several long-sleeved layers didn’t do much to shield us from the brisk winds during this cool and breezy day. It was hard to imagine that the temperatures had climbed to nearly 100 degrees the weekend before. Despite the weather, we happily socialized as we worked beneath a shelter at a local county park. The item that we were to assemble was a cute round, (continuous weave structure); a pumpkin-shaped basket. Here are the steps that our incredible instructor took us through during this four-hour weekend event.

Dividing the disk into 4 equal parts, place 23 spokes within the well of the disk; weaving while working in the spokes.After weaving 6 continuous rows, gently begin shaping the basket upwards. Continue weaving upward for 14 more rows; loosely weaving to shape the belly of the pumpkin.

At row 19 or 20 begin to tighten the weave to form the top of the pumpkin.

At row thirty, the weave is complete.Bend down, every other spoke. Clip; mark remaining spokes to bend under and secure under weave.Secure wire handle before finishing rim of the basket.Complete basket rim with sea grass and lashing.We enjoyed a beautiful, but chilly, day at our local county park!

Posted in Crafts, Gifts, holiday, holidays

Wrapping Things Up…

In the midst of all of the holiday hoopla and Christmas shopping, I realized that there may be a load of practical gift cards that might be received far better than any piece of clothing or fancy kitchen gadget.  For students, especially those living in highly populated cities, transportation can be an issue.  Gift cards focused on shuttling a person from one destination to another might be much more appreciated versus a piece of clothing.  Train passes, Uber gift cards, bus passes, etc. are all good ideas.  Last year my sister in law gave my children transportation gift cards and they were used to shuttle them to the local grocery store, to the airport, and home from the local burger and brew joint.  (Each of my children are in college and over the age of 21.). They also received gift cards from the local drug store where they were able to by toiletries, milk, and basic groceries while on campus.  Another great idea for college students, gifts cards for sandwich shops and local eateries.  Many dorm cafeterias are closed on Sunday evenings so having a gift card for a local diner is always appreciated.

Be creative as you think of ways to “wrap” your gift cards.  Think of using beautiful paper scraps, college themed papers, Christmas wrap, or themed scrap book papers.  I recently purchased some high-end soap from a local discount store.  The soap was wrapped in a beautiful heavy weight paper that I just couldn’t throw away.  This gave me the idea to use the paper as a wrap for a small gift; hence, a gift wrap for the gift card.  Here’s what I did…

I found a template here. Or, Google various gift card envelope images for the shape you prefer.



I gathered an assortment of scrap paper, and the beautiful wrapping paper found on some milled soaps.

I printed the template and traced the outline on various scraps.I penciled in some fold lines.

I thought it might be nice to have a contrasting liner.Using a few paper punches, I fashioned a gift tag.



Use Christmas paper, shopping bags, newspaper… Whatever you like.This is an enjoyable way to personize and make personal, an ordinary, yet purposeful gift card.



Posted in Crafts, Gifts

Footed Market Basket

I had a wonderful time attending a local basketmaking workshop held at a rustic county park in my area. The weather was beautiful and the scenery was gorgeous. We sat under a shelter with several picnic tables that were lined up for all of the class participants. Just prior to the session we were mailed a list of supplies needed for the construction of the basket. We each brought along an old towel, some clips to hold the basket in place, scissors, a large bucket and a spray bottle to keep the wooden strips wet while working with them. We carefully listened to the instructor as she effortlessly managed teaching and assisting the 20 students before her. The item that we would be constructing is called a Footed Market Basket. I tried to take pictures as I worked through the steps while making this adorable basket.

…Can’t wait to sign up for another session!

Posted in Crafts

Beginner Garden Basket

On a recent trip to Kentucky, I purchased an adorable basket kit.  I must say, I’m not an experienced basket weaver, in fact, I am constantly seeking out classes so that I might gain more knowledge and skill pertaining to this craft.  Unfortunately, I have been unsuccessful finding a face-to-face class in my area so I usually review an abundance of internet videos to try to learn more about basket construction. 

When I entered the darling, rustic shop,  I was mesmerized by the abundance of wood strips, twine and basket making supplies carefully organized and perfectly displayed from floor to ceiling.  I must have spent 45 minutes just looking over everything the owner had displayed. I was taking it all in when a friendly women asked if I needed assistance.  I explained to the owner that I had very little experience and would like to complete a simple project.  She suggested a garden basket that was hanging from the ceiling along with several other beautiful creations.  With some hesitation, I purchased the suggested kit.  

When I returned home and opened the package to review the project.  I was pleasantly surprised by the simplistic instructions and the quality materials provided by the owner of this darling shop. Within the kit, each small bundle of wooden strips and twine was carefully measured and labeled to help me navigate through the supplies.  


It took me some time to come up with the courage to begin this project, but once I started, I kept at it until the basket was complete.  I am thrilled with the end product.  While it’s not perfect, (It’s a little wonky and maybe a bit slimmer than was intended) it’s one of my first basket weaving projects and I’m quite happy with my beginner skills.

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I tried to take a few pictures as I progressed through the instructions. Those of you that might be basket makers can chime in to let me know if I’m doing something wrong…

I cut a circle of craft paper tracing the wood basket bottom disk and folding the paper to divide it into four equal parts.


I then marked the wooden bottom.

I soaked the wooden strips to make them pliable.

I evenly place the spokes around the disk.

Time to add some twine.

As per my instructions, I begin weaving up the side of the basket.



I soaked the colored strips for a short period as they have a tendency to bleed onto the natural wood.

Trimming and bending the rim…

Tightening things up and making a space for the handle…


Setting in the hinged handle…

Finishing up…



Not perfect, but it will do just fine!

Posted in Crafts, Uncategorized

Traveling with Portable Craft Projects


The greatest dilemma I face when traveling is “How can I travel with a few compact and relaxing crafts while I’m away from the amenities of home?”
Once a year, we travel to Disney World and I am often stumped as to what I can bring along that isn’t too complicated or oversized.

I have thought about bringing quilt squares to hand sew poolside but the sewing machine does a much better job of securing the blocks as opposed to my, less than stellar hand sewing skills. I have also thought about bringing along my long term crochet projects but most are large, cumbersome (blankets or scarves) and too hot to be draped across my lap in the summer sun.
This year, I visited a YouTube website and found a video for a super easy crocheted sock pattern and I was thrilled to find a project that I could easily travel with.  

Here’s the website: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gasKXmcyrXgGlamma’s easy crocheted tube socks

Here are a few pictures of the craft items I carried in my tote bag. 

Here are a few other ideas I packed for soaking up the sun in a relaxed environment:


All were perfectly portable and helped me to find plenty to do as I relaxed in the sunshine of the Walt Disney World – Old Key West -Disney Vacation Club – Main Pool.



Who says Spring Break in Walt Disney World can’t be relaxing?!  Once again, we had a “magical” vacation.

Posted in Crafts

Adorable Sock Snowman Craft

At a recent holiday party, one of my co-workers was kind enough to demonstrate the assembly of this adorable sock snowman craft.  You won’t believe how quick and easy this no-sew project is to assemble.  A simple white sock, some string, and a few sewing notions make for the cutest of holiday projects for any age to enjoy. 

While I was lucky enough to have a personal tutorial, I was able to find a similar link for a quick tutorial video. Here it is… https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pB4jFqkn8MY

Posted in Crafts

Our Very Own Little Free Library



For the past several months, I’ve been working with a local literacy coalition to help promote the love of reading in our schools and regional communities.  One of the ideas that we proposed was to promote Little Free Libraries in our urban and rural environments.  I figured the best way for me to promote this idea was to create one myself.  

Throughout the campaign we’ve been stressing the use of recycled materials and simplistic design.  When I presented the idea to my husband, the creative juices began to flow and he soon constructed this adorable residential Little Free Library.  To learn more about constructing and registering your very own LFL, visit littlefreelibrary.org

This is a grass roots movement and the LFL site includes a world map where registered LFL locations are posted so that those interested in doing a tour or an afternoon bike ride to visit all of the “mini libraries” in their area can print the map and get going.

As I mentioned earlier, we promote the idea of using simplistic, recycled materials to bring to life this lovely idea to stress the importance of reading in your community.  Use old furniture, large baskets, cartons, or plastic tubs to make inexpensive, upcyled models.  My husband found scrap wood and other building materials to make this LFL for our home.  His skill level might be better than most but don’t stress about the perfect model.  Stick with your skill level and be as simplistic or as ornate as you like.  Check out all the images on the site to inspire ideas for your very own Little Free Library.


























Posted in Crafts, Gifts, holiday, holidays, Sewing

Hand Made Friendship Hearts

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Years ago, as I was rummaging through the craft section of a local area garage sale, I stumbled upon a box of beads, sequins, golden threads, and patterns. I scooped it up and asked the owner how much was needed for the treasure. To my delight, she said $1.00 would fit the bill. I gathered up a few more crafting trinkets (some sewing and embroidery supplies) along with the box of sequined treasures, paid the kind lady, and I was on my way.
Shortly after arriving home, I took out a heart shaped cookie cutter and traced several small hearts on a light gray felt square. I carefully cut the heart shapes out and stitched on enough sequins and beads to cover the entire surface of one heart shape. On another heart shaped felt piece, I secured a pin back so that eventually, my project would become a pin. I then used a tiny blanket stitch (gray thread or monofilament) to sew the two felt heart shapes, wrong sides together, leaving a small opening to stuff in a bit of batting. After closing up the opening, I would plump up the heart shape by using my fingers to evenly distribute the batting tucked inside. Voila, the pin is complete!
I then used printable business cards to create a message, printed a sheet and punched two holes in each card to secure the pin back. I used small cellophane bags to envelope the pin/card and tied a bow for a sweet finish.
I have given these pins out at weddings, for Valentine’s Day, and for Mother’s Day. They are quick and simple and require very few supplies. Happy Valentine’s Day!

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